TAG Episode 16 (AAC)- 26Jul2011 VF progression risk fx with Gus DeMoraes

Talking About Glaucoma #16 for late July 2011 - Dr Gus De Moraes, Risk factors for VF Progression in glaucoma patients


In this episode, Dr De Moraes and I discuss risk factors for visual field progression in patients already diagnosed with and being treated for glaucoma.

Dr De Moraes’ group found that patients with established glaucoma were more likely to progress when peak IOP was 18 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) or higher. Other risk factors included thinning of the cornea, presence of disc hemorrhage in the retina of the eye, and atrophy in part of the eye.

This study was supported by the Joseph and Geraldine LaMotta Research Fund of the New York Glaucoma Research Institute, and one investigator’s work was supported by the Glaucoma Research and Education Fund of Lenox Hill Hospital; both institutions are located in New York. Please see the article in Archives of Ophthalmology cited in these notes for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support.

Dr Gustavo De Moraes is Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the New York University School of Medicine.

Dr De Moraes’ constact information:

Gustavo De Moraes, M.D.
New York Eye and Ear Infirmary
310 East 14th Street
New York, NY 10003
Tel:  (212) 477-7540 Extension: 375
email: gustavonyee@gmail.com


http://www.med.nyu.edu/people/demorc02.html

This episode was recorded live in March 2011 during the American Glaucoma Society annual meeting using a Shure SM58 microphone with a Marantz PMD661 digital recorder. Mixing and sound levelling were performed on a MacBook Pro and MacBook Air using Levelator, Fission, and Garage Band. Narration was overdubbed using a Blue Microphone Yeti.

Opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and are not intended to be taken as the standard of care for glaucoma treatment. Please always weigh the complete clinical picture and involve patients with any decisions in their care.

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Selected reference:
Arch Ophthalmol. 2011;129[5]:562-568. (http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/129/5/562)


Robert M Schertzer, MD, MEd, FRCSC
Clinical Associate Professor
Dept of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
University of British Columbia
podcast@iguy.org
http://iguy.tv/podcast

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